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-eakin and aol co-founder steve case, at the aspen institute for 30 minutes. >> next we have a panel on america and where it is going, steve clemens -- steve clemons is the empress area of washington ideas. >> hey, folks. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic, i want to compliment the museum and tell you how historic this is. this is a jam packed day. the google party is coming up, this is one of three times in the history of the museum that they have allowed an outside group, the other happened to be the president of the united states and madeleine albright when she was secretary of state, this is the third time for a during the day session here, this is a great partnership. i think the -- i have a friend here, allen was the founder of circuit city, just apparently wrote the rise and fall of circuit city and to some degree they are uncomfortable truths, when you think of nations and companies, there are rise and fall stories and the united states is so clean not on the f
of costs which are going to escalate in the near future and bankrupt america because we can't afford spending on the elderly, on social security and medicare. well, i think if you're a oceanographer or even a mere surfer, none of these -- and this comes from "the washington post" -- none of these actually look like tidal waves. i know it's kind of small, it goes out to 2040. if you just look at the top two, health care spending, public health care spending, medicare and medicaid and social security, the second chart, if you look at social security, as monique said earlier, it goes from a little less than 5% now to about 6% by the middle of the 21st century. that's not exactly a tsunami that threatens to destroy our civilization and calls for immediate, urgent action. what it means is simply over half a century we need to either raise revenues by about 1.5% of gdp, or alternative if you want you could cut social security's benefits by that amount, or you could have some compromise. or you could think about reform within the context of the retirement system as a whole, and arguably as
education the vast majority of what we do in america k-12 higher education is done by public institutions. it's done by public institutions that are run by states. a lot of other work including most charter schools are nonprofits or famous institutions like stanford and harvard and yale and princeton. and then, however, there's a substantial swath of activity that is for-profits, both for-profits that run schools or colleges. there is also for-profits that sell everything from pencils to paper to textbooks, to curricula, to professional development and school systems and universities and colleges. we don't often think about that. we don't often think about what the upsides, what are the downsides, how does that play out and that's what we really want to get into today. for instance, just recently our friends at parent revolution said, you know, when thinking about the parent trigger that we, you know, there's a need to regulate. we need to think about where to draw the lines and what kind of operators to permit, they choose not to encourage, for-profits be permitted to participate because
examining america's education system and the impact on national security. council on foreign relations moderates the discussion, about an hour. >> welcome to this evening, broadcast of morning joe. the energy in this room is a real testament to two things. one is how the education reform has ripened, a combination of meade, the talent we see in this room has coalesced on the issue of new technologies but there is a sense that the moment has arrived and the other is jeb bush. [applause] >> i am a great believer that two things matter in life. won his ideas and the other is people. that is the real driver of change, the real driver of history. when you unpack it all and jeb bush is a perfect example. the coming together of a person with real talent and drive with a set of ideas and this is one of them. the fact that you are all here is the greatest salute you could give. condoleezza rice and i come out of a national security background. we use to mess around with something called the rand bond calculator. xbox it used to calculate what was known as the cp, the circular error of probable
. that will be live here on c-span2 starting at 1:30 p.m. eastern. >> america ranks 29th thousands speed of the an attack such leading industrial likes of the world as moby and ukraine. moldavia and ukraine. we pay the highest price and were by far. by one match with a 38 times what the japanese paper bit of information. if you buy one of these triple play packages and i have one in my home, you pay on average with taxes and use $160. in france you pay $38 u.s., and you get worldwide calling to 70 countries are not just u.s. and canada. you get worldwide television, not just domestic, and your internet is 20 times faster uploading and 10 times faster downloading, and your bank is than 25 cents on the dollar. all these other countries understand the fundamental principle, in the 19th century, canals and railroads were the key to economic growth as industrial nation came along and you had to move heavy things like steel. the 20 century came along, it was highways, interstate highway program and airports that were crucial to economic growth. now it's the information superhighway. what does
focus on the real issues facing america, like catching up -- that's a homeland is a tv show on showtime. [laughter] let's move to nonfiction. it is a privilege for me to be at the council on foreign relations, and thank you for hosting, and and for moderating. i see a number of people in the audience who have done such important work in the space, some of my colleagues and other government agencies. i see charlie firestone from the aspen institute, very involved in issues that i will be talking about today. let me start with one provocative sentence from jeffrey sachs of columbia university. he said recently the information and communications technology revolution is surely the most powerful single force for economic development in the world today. so i want to talk about that today, about the enormous opportunities the broadband revolution is creating. i will also talk about the dangerous fact that the global internet is at a crossroads. threats to the future of the internet have never been more serious, and if we don't tackle these threats, the u.s. and other nations will pay the pric
that will help the american people to progress. i want to see america -- >> host: you want compromise? >> caller: i want compromise, yes. but i'm going to tell you this, and make no mistake about it, we have people in this country that have completely destroyed rather than try to compromise and try to bring the government to some sort of conclusion where everybody will benefit. some people in this country feel as though other people should not exist or have any benefit and they would do everything possible, spend all their money, disrupt the government and do whatever they can to prevent other people from having a happy life. >> host: let me ask you this. do you think that president obama should govern as if he has a mandate? how far should he pushed, should he be aggressive? >> caller: he has to be aggressive because if he doesn't -- >> host: is that compromise though? >> caller: you can be aggressive and still compromise. let me say this, the congress is the tea party for and if obama or romney or the other was president we would still have trouble because the tea party has an agenda and we ha
with agriculture. they basically defined them as a child molesting aliens out to destroy the fabric of america and showed them the commercials and said you know, if we don't get what we want, millions of dollars can be spent on commercials just like this and they got what they wanted and didn't have to spend any money. that is what this has done and this isn't corrupting they were on a different planet in the different universe than the real world of what we face. so there is all of that to deal with and we are getting them all legislation being written by the outside interest the gets plugged right in. it is the gilded age brought up to the 21st century, and nothing that we want. i want to take a little -- i always like to find places i can take issue with tom so i want to address the question. i actually don't believe that the right wing of -- without representing the republican party represents the republican party we have survey after survey that shows on a range of issues of identified republicans do not take the same positions. the tea party consists of a lot of older voters that have no
know, america is going down the wrong track, and if we don't do something about it now, if we don't get our country back on the road to growth and prosperity, my 13-year-old son jack, all of our children and our grandchildren won't inherit the same country that we did. there are two philosophies in this race, one that believes in government as the solution, the other belief, my belief, it believes in the individual, it believes in you. while my opponent supports president obama's big government agenda, i'm fighting against the president's failed policies because i believe north dakotans, not washington, ought to be trusted to make decisions about their family, their money and their opportunities. now, i agree -- i grew up in western north dakota, i started a business in north dakota, i served in the best citizens' legislature in the country where we created policies that have made north dakota the envy of the nation. in north dakota we balance our budget. we do it by living within our means and making the decisions today, not tomorrow or next year. that's the north dakota way, and that'
in the united states. and it's the beginning of these gaps that we talk about that create a different america. better to have a system that says every child that god has given the ability to being literate, by the start of fourth grade is literate. and develop strategies to make sure that it happens. have no tolerance for the political correctness of our time, that assures that too many people, too many young people, particularly kids living at or near the poverty level will have no chance to be successful. the states that embrace these social promotion policy that does not allow that to happen, that recognizes that we need early intervention for reading strategies as has been implement in states like colorado, and has no tolerance for the acceptance of failure will be the states that excel over the next decade of done. accountability, truly, truly matters. in seven states have started on this journey. talk to them about how hard it is but talk to them about the joy of seeing how you can change lives at an early age to ensure that the kids begin to graduate from high school, rather than being
. we shouldn't rule out the entire range of potential terrorist attacks and what would do to america's relations and to america's set of priorities in the middle east taking down an airplane blowing of the series of embassies and attacking civilians, foreign governments as was tried in washington with the attack on the saudi ambassador and the foreign governments using terrorism even on our soil. it is a whole range of possibilities. let's not for close dealing with them. third, a sinai clash on steroids. we saw in august of 2011, how the attempt by terrorists, the effort by the terrorists to kill the israelis triggered the reaction that ended up with the egypt and israel peace treaty being this far away from total collapse. i measured this as being the thickness on the door of the israeli embassy in cairo outside of which the protesters were banding down the door to attack the american -- the diplomats on the other side of the door. and that is when the military controlled egypt. today there is a different situation. another clash triggered by terrorists seeking to promote egypt, is
on energy and environment and education that the president had a vision for where america needs to be in this new century where we've got rising competition in china and germany and india and if we're going to have an american century we cannot come in second place to those countries in technology of the future. and i think that played an important role. there was a sense that the obama vision was one that they thought better suited this moment in our country's history. and there is no question on social issues whether it's women's healthcare or immigration. there was asset of issues that for younger voters was important to think about the kind of country and kind of president they wanted representing them. so on all those questions people wrestled carefully. i think that's why ultimately enough people in enough battleground states chose the president to continue this journey we're on. quickly in terms of demoggrafi. we don't know this for sure but we could be seeing different elections in on years and off years. the election in 2014 is going to be different than presidential le
Search Results 0 to 11 of about 12